News & Jobs Page

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Reuters: Nebraska corn fields hit by disease

It's too early to tell how destructive the disease will be this season, Tamra Jackson-Ziems, extension plant pathologist with the UNL Department of Plant Pathology, said.

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microscope view of virus
Monday, March 3, 2014

National Geographic: Ancient "giant virus" revived from Siberian permafrost

A team of French researchers have discovered an ancient virus buried deep in the Siberian permafrost, untouched for 30,000 years. Though microscopic, it is a so-called "giant virus," much larger than normal specimens and more genetically complex. James Van Etten, a University of Nebraska-Lincoln plant pathology who is an authority on viruses, edited the study led by Jean-Michel Claverie and Chantal Abergel of Aix-Marseille University in Marseille, France.

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Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Dr. Loren Giesler accepted the position of Acting Head of the Department

Dr. Loren Giesler has agreed to serve as Acting Head of the Department effective November 6, 2017 through January 2, 2018. The IANR Senior Leadership Team appreciates Loren’s willingness to accept this important role. 

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Wednesday, July 30, 2014

AgWeb: Ag experts offer advice on hail damage

University of Nebraska-Lincoln plant pathologist Tamra Jackson-Ziems describes which diseases to look for in hail-damaged corn.

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Monday, November 10, 2014

Columbia Chronicle (Chicago): Plant virus wilts human brain function

James Van Etten, professor of plant pathology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, discusses recent findings that a chlorovirus can infect humans, leading to impaired brain function.

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Monday, November 10, 2014

Newsweek: American researchers discover "stupidity virus."

James Van Etten, a plant pathologist at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, discusses the discovery of a virus --previously believed to infect only algae -- in the throats of human participants in an unrelated study. Those infected with the virus were found to perform more slowly on cognitive function tests.

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Monday, November 10, 2014

The Inquisitr: Scientists discover virus that makes people more stupid

Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medical School and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln discovered a virus normally found in freshwater algae also exists in humans. In addition, those with the virus appear to have impaired cognitive performance. Co-author James Van Etten, a plant pathologist at UNL, says more and more studies show microorganisms have a bigger influence on your body than previously predicted.

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Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Stacy Krueger-Hadfield visits PLPT

Dr. Stacy Krueger-Hadfield visited the Department of Plant Pathology November 15 as a invited 2017 FALL 2017 BIOTECHNOLOGY / LIFE SCIENCES SEMINAR SERIES speaker. Dr. Krueger-Hadfield is a Assistant Professor at University of Alabama at Birmingham. Her seminar was titled “The Curious Case of Complex Life Cycles: Mating System Variation in Haploid-Diploid Seaweeds” Krueger-Hadfield met with faculty and students during her stay for further discussion during meals and appointments.  

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Monday, November 10, 2014

CNET: Scientists say there's a virus that makes you stupid

A surprise discovery found that the ATCV-1 virus, which comes from algae, seems to affect human cognition. Previously, it had been thought that humans weren't prone to infection by this virus. James Van Etten, a University of Nebraska-Lincoln plant pathologist involved in the research, says that the virus doesn't appear to be contagious. CNET writer Chris Matyszczyk quips that the virus may explain those days when you can't get things right.

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Friday, May 22, 2015

Greeley Tribune: Wheat rust a growing problem for Colorado, Weld County farmers

Wheat rust, a fungal disease that reduced grain production, has raised major concerns among Colorado farmers. The disease is occurring earlier and more widespread than in the past. Stephen Wegulo, an extension plant pathologist at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, said it costs $25 to $30 per acre to treat wheat with a fungicide.

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